The Cribbage Player's Text-Book

Courtesy of Archive.org and Google Books, here is an ebook called "The Cribbage Player's Text-Book".

Subtitled "A New and Complete Treatise on the Game, in All Its Varieties; Including the Whole of Anthony Pasquin's Scientific Work on Five-Card Cribbage", the book was compiled by George Walker and published in London in 1837.

The Cribbage Player's Text-Book - Cover   The Cribbage Player's Text-Book - Title Page   The Cribbage Player's Text-Book - Illustration

Here is Mr. Walker's preface to the book:

As a game of cards for two persons only, Cribbage is universally popular, and both Piquet and Ecarte must give place to its pretensions. There exists, indeed, no similar species of amusement, in which the rival powers of chance and skill are so happily blended; -- and, while the influence of fortune is perpetually recognized as a source of pleasing excitement, there remains sufficient room for the exercise of the intellectual faculties, to insure their final attainment of success. In Cribbage, as in other games, the ignorant go on, playing at random, and trusting solely to what they term "their luck;" -- while those who are better informed, do not disdain to acquire the art of guiding that "luck" towards their own side of the board. During the run of a few consecutive games, skill may be compelled to yield to the power of adverse cards; but in a longer series of play, its influence will most certainly predominate.

There has never hitherto appeared but one really scientific Treatise on Cribbage; that one being the work of the well know Anthony Pasquin. At the time of first publication, his book attained considerable celebrity, and was acknowledged as the most complete system of practical theory extant on the subject. It has long been out of print, and copies have be-come extremely scarce. Perhaps the strongest proofs of the public demand for the reproduction of some such volume, are now afforded in the numerous innocent questions addressed weekly to the Editor of Bell's Life In London; requesting information and instruction on the most simple rudiments of the game.

In the compilation of the following pages, the whole of Pasquin's work has been embodied, with such additions as the writer thought necessary to the formation of "The Cribbage-Player's Text-Book." The calculations have been revised, -- the rudiments of the game explained for the improvement of beginners -- and his own share of original matter being proportionably small, the Author is the more confidently entitled to pronounce his opinion as to the merits of the new edition, here presented, of "Anthony Pasquin's Treatise On Five-Card Cribbage."

This seminal work on the game of Cribbage contains rules, strategy tips, variations, and even techniques for detecting and thwarting cheaters.

The book contains 11 chapters:

  1. Of what the game of Cribbage consists
  2. For what you mark at Cribbage
  3. The Laws of Cribbage; with cases of illustration
  4. On counting at Cribbage
  5. On laying out for the Crib; including the best methods of discarding, both for your own and your adversary's Crib, in nearly eight hundred cases of hands at Five Card Cribbage
  6. General directions for playing the game of Five-Card Cribbage scientifically; including remarks on Betting, with statements of the different odds at various points of the score; Curious problem at Five-Card Cribbage
  7. On Six-Card Cribbage.
  8. On Three-Handed Cribbage
  9. On Four-Handed Cribbage; Curious problem at Four-Handed Cribbage
  10. On various disputed points at Cribbage
  11. On Cheating or False Play

The entire content of the book is available from Archive.org, in a number of formats, including PDF, EPUB, Kindle, Daisy, and Full Text (unfortunately, the OCR is really poor). The book may also be read interactively: read online.

The EPUB and Kindle versions of the book may be downloaded for free to your favorite ebook reader (such as the Amazon Kindle

Thanks to Archive.org and Google Books for bringing us this important historical Cribbage text!



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